Tuesday, July 21, 2009

Hitting My Head on a Rock

When you're painting giant letters on a rock formation, you should probably make sure you proofread the text first. So few letters, so many mistakes...


Eric, who sent us the gorgeous photo above, says he thinks that sign is supposed to say "Hole in the Rock" (not "and"), and the restaurant's web site proves him right. If the quotation mark were an apostrophe, this sign would read, "Hole No the Rock," which doesn't really make sense.

While Eric reports that Hole N" the Rock was consistent with its bizarre quotation mark/double apostrophe throughout, the web site sometimes calls the place Hole "N The Rock and sometimes Hole N" the Rock.

Clearly, the people who designed the signage and web site for this place hit their head on rocks in Arches National Park a few too many times.

Thanks, Eric! You rock!

3 comments:

James L. Greenlee said...

As a sign designer, I've always been bugged by people monkeying around with -N- or "N" or 'N.

There used to be a feed store here in Las Vegas with a flourescent green fiberglass horse and a sign that read, Horse "N" Around Too. I drove by it everyday, and thought, "really?"

Equally bad (though not apostrophe related) was Ice Cream Cones & Etc. back in Ohio.

Love you're site. That was on purpose.

The Hole N' The Rock Gang said...

I must agree that the spelling is incorrect, but Gladys Christensen commissioned a gentleman by the name if Del Koops in the early 1950's to paint both sides of the rock. The letters have been there since that time. When it was time to repaint them, lots of time was spent talking to locals and tourists alike for their input. It was an overwhelming vote that to correct it would mean changing the landmark itself and even though it is quirky, we chose to leave it as Gladys left it. Thank you, The Hole N' The Rock Gang

Becky said...

Thanks for your feedback! It's good to know the historical significance of the Hole N' the Rock.