Friday, February 27, 2009

New Ways to Screw Up Punctuation

News agent is such a commonly used expression in the UK that I don't understand how anyone could get it wrong. But somehow Sweet N Things in Brighton, England, managed to.


Thanks to Mark for uploading this appalling example of apostrophe misuse to this blog's facebook group.

Cheers!

10 comments:

Marie said...

I always hoped that because England is the birthplace or our language the Brits would have more respect for grammatical convention. Alas, apparently not.

Jim said...

In the field of cutting edge punctuation errors, they are indeed new's agent.

Also: do the British really spell licence like that?

Becky said...

Yes, believe it or not, that's the British spelling for license.

Jim said...

Well I'll be.

Willie C said...

In Brighton, no lie? I've always thought that their use of the language was somewhat less corrupted than ours.....Oh, well, another myth busted.

Currant Bunbury said...

"I've always thought that their use of the language was somewhat less corrupted than ours....."

Nope. There's ignorance and poor education all over the world, mate. ;)

Daniel said...

Oh, the chances! I become infuriated every time I pass this shop on the bus...

Becky said...

You've seen it?? That's so funny!

The Naked Blacksmith said...

Is it just me, or shouldn't that sign say "Sweets"? I guess if it's a proper name the answer would be no.

Anonymous said...

I think people are a bit shy about mentioning that Britain's immigrant population has exploded and immigrants these days don't assimilate like they used to and don't hesitate to corrupt the language of their adopted country. Heck, they often don't even learn the language. Angela Merkel and David Cameron, two of Europe's most powerful leaders, have both publicly stated that multiculturalism is not working. And there you have it!